Linkin Park Tour Profile

Apr 1, 2011 9:00 AM, By Sarah Benzuly

GO TO THE SHOW, CATCH IT AGAIN DAYS LATER

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Programming/playback engineer/keyboard tech Dylan Ely (left) and lighting director A.J. Pen

Programming/playback engineer/keyboard tech Dylan Ely (left) and lighting director A.J. Pen

PROGRAM ME
Programming and playback are heavily involved in any Linkin Park adventure—be it in the studio or live. After engineer Dylan Ely receives the full album multitrack and the band determines which parts will be played live, he will make stems of those elements from the album that need to be programmed. He uses two Mac laptops (one is a redundant system) running Pro Tools M-Powered playing back all of the stems. The redundant machine is synched to the main machine via MTC, and the backup machine is set to Jam Sync the incoming MTC, “so if the main computer stops, loses power, et cetera, the backup machine will run infinitely at the same rate as it was when it lost timecode.”

Ely breaks down the eight tracks that comprise the stems:
Track 1: typically any low-frequency material, like 808s or maybe the low end of a drum loop that has the high frequency filtered off.

Track 2: usually any type of mono drum loop element that cannot be played live by the drummer.

Tracks 3 and 4: used for any type of sound that has to be stereo, typically a synth or string pad–type sound or a drum loop that is full-frequency with a stereo element to it.

Track 5: any high-end arpeggiated-type synth or a swell.

Track 6: click track that only is going to the bandmembers’ ears onstage.

Track 7: a reference track or a keyboard and/or vocal only heard in the singers’ ears onstage as a pitch reference. Also sometimes a click to “automate” a section for a certain member in their ears, only for a cue or reference.

Track 8: SMPTE. Tmecode is used to run/sync the lights and video during the show.


Sarah Benzuly is Mix’s managing editor.






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